Skipped White Keys For Chord Changing

Skipped White Keys For Chord Changing

Rockmaster Chord Change Formula 3:
Skipped White Keys Method

How to use the Rockmaster Skipped White Keys Method to change chords

Skipped White Keys For Chord Changing

Major Third

The major third spans 5 piano keys – the 2 keys that you are holding, plus 3 skipped keys between.
The 3 skipped keys can be
2 black keys and 1 white key as in C – E, F – A, G – B
or
2 white keys and 1 black key as in D – F#, E – G#, A – C#, B – D# in the sharp keys,
and
Db – F, Eb – G, Gb – Bb, Ab – C, Bb – D in the flat keys.

From this we can say that the major third has 2 skipped white keys except,

C – E, F – A, G – B, which have 1 skipped white key.

Minor Third

The minor third spans 4 piano keys – the 2 keys that you are holding, plus 2 skipped keys between.

The 2 skipped keys can be

1 black key and 1 white key as in

C – Eb, D – F, E – G, F – Ab, G – Bb, A – C, B – D, in the sharp keys
and
Db – Fb, Gb – Bbb (A), Ab – Cb, in the flat keys,
or
2 white keys Eb – Gb, Bb Db

From this we can say that the minor third has 1 skipped white key, except, Eb – Gb, Bb – Db.which
have 2 skipped white keys.

The Perfect Fourth

The perfect fourth spans 6 piano keys – the 2 keys that you are holding, plus 4 skipped keys between.

The 4 skipped keys can be

2 white keys and 2 black keys as in

C – F, D – G, E – A, F – Bb, G – C, A – D, B – E, F# – B (Gb – Cb) for the sharp keys and
F – Bb
or
3 white keys and 1 black keys as in Db – Gb, Eb – Ab, Ab – Db, Bb – Eb, Gb – Cb for the
flat keys.

From this we can say that the perfect fourth has 2 skipped white key for the sharp keys and
3 skipped white keys for the flat keys.

The Perfect Fifth

The perfect fifth spans 8 piano keys – the 2 keys that you are holding, plus 6 skipped keys between.

The 6 skipped keys can be

3 white keys and 3 black keys as in

C – G, D – A, E – B, F – C, G – D, A – E, for the sharp keys
or
4 white keys and 2 black keys as in B – F#, Db – A, Eb – Bb, Gb – Db, Ab – Eb, Bb – F,
for B – F# and the flat keys.

From this we can say that the perfect fifth has 3 skipped white key for the sharp keys and

4 skipped white keys for the flat keys.

Skipped White Keys Method

It is much simpler to count white keys, so we will use the white keys to determine intervals.

This is the Skipped White Keys Method.

Use this method to determine intervals for chord changes.

1 skipped white keys will be a minor third or or a major third or an adjacent note
.
2 skipped white keys wil be a minor third or a major third or a perfect fourth.

3 skipped white keys will be a perfect fourth or a perfect fifth.

4 skipped white keys will be a perfect fifth.
It is the white keys that get the letter name. When you land on a black key, you could say that is just “accidental” LOL.
Count your interval from white key to white key. The starting and ending keys of the interval are inclusive.
C-E is C-D-E is a 3rd. You finger the bottom and the top keys, the other keys are the skipped white keys (one).

C-G is C-D-E-F-G, a 5th. You finger the bottom and the top keys, the other keys are the skipped white keys (three).
C-F is C-D-E-F, a 4th. You finger the bottom and the top keys, the other keys are the skipped white keys (two).
When the interval ends on the black key above the named white key, you pick up an extra white key in the interval.
D-F# is D-E-F#, a 3rd. A third would normally be 1 skipped white key but here you have 2 skipped white keys.
When the interval starts on the black key below the named white key you pick up an extra white key in the interval.
Ab – C is Ab-Bb-C, a 3rd. A third would normally be 1 skipped white key but here you have 2 skipped white keys.

 

Chord Changing Methods